ETSU Student Volunteers

Thank you to East Tennessee State University’s Service Learning Program for volunteering to assist with land management at SAHC’s Bird House Preserve in the Highlands of Roan. Student volunteers helped remove old structures and continued Golden-winged Warbler habitat management on the property. In the process we salvaged roughly 50 black locust posts that will be used for future trail maintenance.

Roan Recreation Updates 2019

We are working with Pisgah and Cherokee National Forests, the Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC), and Tennessee Eastman Hiking and Canoeing Club (TEHCC) to address recreational impacts in and around Carver’s Gap and Grassy Ridge. This area, with easy access to stunning scenic views along the Appalachian Trail, has experienced significant increases in visitation. We joined these partners for two work days this summer, to repair and restore a section of the trail going up Jane Bald. In addition, new signage and interpretative materials are planned for 2020.

Over the course of the summer, Roan Naturalist Sarah Jones interacted with more than 8,500 people on the Appalachian Trail. Sarah taught visitors about the ecology of the Roan Highlands and the role that SAHC and other partners play in protecting the landscape.  She shared Leave No Trace ethics and provided support for hikers of all levels. We are very appreciative to our friends at the ATC and the TEHCC for their support of this position.

College Students Volunteer in the Roan

Students from Mars Hill University and Warren Wilson College joined us this spring for a Golden-winged Warbler habitat management workday and camping trip along the Appalachian Trail in the Highlands of Roan.

The energetic volunteers cleared downed tree limbs and lopped saplings to create ideal breeding ground for this threatened species of neo-tropical migratory songbirds. Read more

Elk Hollow Preserve Trail Work

Our Elk Hollow Preserve Volunteer Work Day in April was a success, thanks to an incredible group of folks who joined us in building trails, friendships, and partnerships! Read more

Welcome, New Trustees!

Thank you to the following for committing to serve a new 3-year term on SAHC’s Board of Trustees. These individuals have graciously volunteered to devote their time and expertise to help carry out our mission. (Pictured, L to R: Tom Williams, Chris Soto, Rich Preyer, Nancy Edgerton)

Nancy Edgerton Asheville, NC
Nancy previously served on SAHC’s board, including a term as President, and has continued to volunteer on our Governance Committee. She and her husband Ron are dedicated participants in our hikes, outings and special events. Nancy is a talented photographer and cellist, and she serves on the Asheville Symphony board.

Rich Preyer Asheville, NC
Rich served two years as SAHC’s  AmeriCorps Member for Public Education and Outreach. He earned a Masters in Environmental Education from Antioch University in New Hampshire and is currently a Youth Education Associate with the NC Arboretum. Rich is enthusiastic about our Connecting People with Land program and Equity, Diversity and Inclusion initiative.

Chris Soto Johnson City, TN
Chris is senior editor and content manager with the Land Trust Alliance. She ensures that land conservation stories are shared among the different communications vehicles at the Alliance, in print and online. She manages the award- winning quarterly magazine, Saving Land. Before the Alliance, Chris managed publications at the Wildlife Habitat Council and American Farmland Trust. She and her husband are dedicated participants in SAHC events and outings and are active with the East Tennessee birding community.

Tom Williams Fairview, NC
Tom recently retired from Duke Energy as its Director of Corporate Media and Executive Support. He and his wife Laurie especially appreciate the conservation easements SAHC holds on land in Fairview. Tom is enthusiastic about helping SAHC with communications, development and engagement.

Roan Stewardship 2018

In the Highlands of Roan, Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy convenes a multi-partner effort to manage the world’s largest stretch of Appalachian grassy balds. These unique ecosystems contain a variety of rare plants.

SAHC volunteers and our partners with the NC BRIDGE program contributed more than 1,900 hours to manage habitat on Roan’s grassy balds this summer. Altogether, Roan stewardship partners managed a record 32 acres. Volunteers and BRIDGE partners hand-mowed more than 17 acres from Round Bald to Grassy Ridge, cutting back blackberry and shrubs across the balds. The US Forest Service mechanically mowed 15 acres on Hump Mountain.

The BRIDGE crew are hardworking stewardship partners. A program of the NC Division of Prisons the NC Division of Forest Resources to train young, non-violent offenders with firefighting and forestry skills, BRIDGE stands for “BUILDING, REHABILITATING, INSTRUCTING, DEVELOPING, GROWING, EMPLOYING.

Our Roan stewardship work is supported by grants from the National Forest Foundation, McLendon Family Foundation and the Appalachian Trail Conservancy.

Thank you to all the volunteers, partners, and supporters who make this work possible!