Black Soldier Fly Digester Build Workshop

filling-the-digester“Black Soldier Fly” — the name resonates with fear and dread, and perhaps even conjures an image of winged, facet-eyed soldiers wielding guns. In reality, black soldier flies (Hermetia illucens) are useful native critters that chew through organic remnants, helping turn organic material into compost while producing tasty treats for chickens.

The black soldier fly is a non-pest tropical and warm-temperate region insect useful for managing small and large amounts of biosolids and animal manure. They are native to this region but do not like to come indoors — so you won’t find them buzzing around the dinner table. They do not feed as adults or spread disease like other flies. Although large and potentially scary-looking, since the females can be about the size of a large wasp, they do not bite humans or livestock. After black soldier fly residue is vermicomposted, it can be used as a soil amendment. Read more

Meet the Farmers at Our Community Farm!

Matt Coffay and Casara Logan of Second Spring Market Garden are in the house! The greenhouse, that is.

We want to send a big welcome to these first vegetable producers in our new Farmer Incubator Program, and a thank you to all the volunteers who helped put up infrastructure so they can start growing.

Second Spring Market Garden offers Asheville’s first 52-week CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) supplying fresh produce year-round. They will be growing a variety of vegetables using organic methods and efficient four-season production with two heated greenhouses now in place on our Community Farm. Read more

Helping Hands on the Farm – French Broad River Academy

fbra_blog4Middle school kids these days have a bit of a bad rap — they watch too much TV, they have no work ethic, and they never go outside. Well, whoever says that has never met the students from the French Broad River Academy. Over the past year-and-a-half the 6th, 7th, and 8th graders from FBRA have volunteered over 700 hours at the SAHC Community Farm! Read more

Year-round gardens growing in greenhouses

puttingupgreenhousesIf you have ever visited a nursery or a commercial farm, you have probably seen large “hoop houses” stretching out sometimes as far as the eye can see. Without these structures, farmers would be limited to growing only during the warm season, thus drastically cutting their production. These season extension devices can range from an unheated plastic covered tunnel too small to walk through, up to engineered glass buildings with automatic venting and precise temperature control. The main objective, however, is the same: to allow the propagation and growing of plants during the colder months of the year. Read more

New farm operation moo-ves into the Community Farm

Last weekend, we welcomed Gina Raicovich and her herd of Pineywoods cattle to our Community Farm in Alexander, NC. Gina started and managed the 60-acre educational University Farm at the University of the South in Sewanee, TN, and is now branching out in her own agricultural venture. Read more

Alternative Fall Break — Emory Students and American Conservation Experience

groupshotWhen you think of a fall break from college, you might think of a ski trip, or going camping, or spending time with your family — but you probably wouldn’t think about doing volunteer work. The students of Emory University have different ideas. Over a September holiday weekend, they drove up from Atlanta to do just that. On Monday, Sept. 13th, SAHC welcomed 21 students to the Community Farm for an entire day of trail work and invasive plant removal. The students came from all grades and fields of study; including neuroscience, Arabic, and dance. Read more

The Right Tools for the Farm

agequip2The cost of farm equipment is something that can make starting a farm feel impossible. Tractors alone can cost upwards of $30,000, and then there are all the implements and attachments that are specific to each agricultural activity. In order to assist farmers in having access to more equipment,  the Buncombe County Soil & Water District and Buncombe Cooperative Extension Service have each purchased several common tractor implements. Purchased through TVA Ag and Forestry Fund grants, these tools are available for local farmers to rent from the respective offices for minimal fees. Use of such equipment can result in higher farm profits by increasing efficiency and land productivity. Read more

Honey Harvest

img_2892Mmmmmmm, sweet, sweet honey — Fresh from the hive! The chronicle of our rescued honeybee hive continued this fall with our first honey harvest. What could be sweeter than seeing this thriving, rescued hive proliferating through the summer and making new honey stores to last through the coming winter? A learning experience that tastes good, too!

A small group of SAHC staff and volunteers gathered in early September on our Community Farm to help crack open the hive and see what our busy little bee folks had in store. Well — a group gathered but mostly watched as Community Farm and Food Assistant Yael Girard did the hands-on pulling of the frames from the hive. First, she demonstrated some protective gear and explained safety to the spectators, suggesting that people get only as close to watch as they felt comfortable, staying out of the bees’ flight path and remaining calm. Read more

A Tree Named Walter

little-anthony_andamericorps“I think that tree needs a name. It looks like a Walter to me.”

“Little” Anthony Giordine is full of surprises. A Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee and legendary vocalist of doo-wop group ‘Little Anthony and the Imperials,’ he seems equally comfortable at a down-home farm or snazzy performance venue. We had the great fortune to meet Anthony when he visited SAHC’s Community Farm in late September to help plant apple trees for the beginning of our orchard. The trees should start bearing fruit in just 2-3 years. Read more

Buzzz, buzz, buzz – Bees Still Buzzin!

p6260122.jpgGood news this summer! Our rescued honeybees made it through the winter – and when Community Farm and Food Assistant Yael Girard peeked inside the hive recently, she had this story to tell:

“The air was hot and heavy with humidity. Below the sounds of bird chirps and wind across the hayfield hummed the low vibration of thousands of tiny bodies beating in unison. The breeze shifted, and the smell of wildflower honey, rich and sweet, filled the air. Lifting off the propolis covered lid of the SAHC Community Farm beehive, I rejoiced to see tiny bee bodies hard at work. Read more