Posts

2022 Virtual Lunch and Learn: SAHC Climate Strategy Action Plan

SAHC Climate Action Plan: Solutions through Conservation

Wednesday, September 28 | 2:00 p.m. 

*Please note the later start time of 2 p.m. (rather than our usual noon Lunch and Learn)

Our virtual Lunch & Learns are back and we are excited to start our Fall series with a presentation from our Duke University Stanback Fellow Claire Elias.

During her internship, Claire conducted an extensive review of climate impacts to ecosystems within SAHC’s geographic conservation focus areas, and researched our organization’s working processes and land trust actions relevant to climate change.

The result is the SAHC Climate Change Action Plan, a living document which will serve as a resource to better communicate about our work as it pertains to climate change, and to help inform future decisions and processes.

Join us for this informative program as Claire presents her research and results of inquiry and shares actions, future recommendations and more ways SAHC will continue to contribute to climate change solutions informed by unique ecological and social contexts.

The Stanback Fellowship Program is a partnership between the Nicholas School of the Environment and non-profit environmental organizations. The purpose of the program is to provide students with significant project-based learning experiences in energy, conservation, advocacy, policy, research and applied resource management. The program is made possible by the generous support of Fred and Alice Stanback.

Register in advance for this webinar:

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Stanback Fellows from Duke University

This summer we welcomed two Stanback Fellow interns from the Duke Nicholas School of the Environment, Claire Elias and Annabelle White. The Stanback Fellowship Program is a partnership between the Nicholas School of the Environment and non-profit environmental organizations. The purpose of the program is to provide students with significant project-based learning experiences in energy, conservation, advocacy, policy, research and applied resource management. The program is made possible by the generous support of Fred and Alice Stanback. Read more

Lunch & Learn: Wildlife Corridors – A Path to Climate Resiliency

When: Tuesday, October 26, 2021, at 12 PM (noon)

FREE and open to the public

As Earth’s climate warms, animals and plants need to be able to migrate in order to continue to thrive. Computer modeling by climate scientists shows that the Southern Appalachians are the crucial pathway for plants and animals to move northwards for survival.

There are many benefits land and water conservation has on building resilience to climate change impacts. Join SAHC and the Wildlands Network to learn more about how wildlife corridors are one of the most critical ways to build human and wildlife resilience to climate change impacts.

Through science-based research and innovative policy, Wildlands Network works to prevent biodiversity loss, promote climate change resilience and transform transportation networks. By collaborating with local partners, like SAHC, they empower communities across North America to safeguard their wild spaces.

Presentation by Nikki Robinson, North Carolina Project Manager, Wildlands Network and Angela Shepherd, SAHC Communications Director.

Register in advance for this webinar:

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

2020 Conservation Review

Map of SAHC conservation projects in 2020Looking back as we head into the final stretch of 2020, we all know that this year has been far from ordinary. On a positive note, it has been a record-breaking year for local conservation efforts! Since the beginning of January, Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy has closed on the protection of more than 2,600 acres across the mountains of Western North Carolina and East Tennessee, with additional projects scheduled to wrap up by year-end. Several of these have been in the works for many years.

“It is a testament to the commitment of SAHC members, staff, and conservation-minded supporters that we have been able to complete these projects during extraordinary circumstances, and we are grateful to all the people who make this remarkable work possible,” says SAHC Executive Director Carl Silverstein. “There is something tangible and reassuring in preserving land – it’s something you can put your hand on. These conservation projects help preserve cultural connections to the past, places to connect with nature, and vital resources we rely on now, and which will be increasingly critical in the future.” Read more

The Future is Now: A New Approach to Land Conservation in a Rapidly Changing Climate

When: Tuesday, April 10 | reception 5:30 p.m. | program begins at 6 p.m. 

Where: The Collider, Downtown Asheville, 1 Haywood Street, 4th Floor 

Worldwide, the conservation community is grappling with the challenge of ensuring that natural systems –  and the species that depend on them – have the ability to adapt to climate change and will continue to thrive.  Fortunately, we know that land protection can strategically increase the resiliency of natural systems. SAHC has partnered with the Conservation Trust for NC, Open Space Institute, Wildlands Network, NEMAC, EcoForesters and The Nature Conservancy (TNC) to develop sophisticated frameworks to assess vulnerability and identify priorities for climate resilience.

Our own Southern Appalachians have been identified as critical to the path of migration for species from the southeast. SAHC continues to use new data and new modeling to build upon our strategic land protection planning. By prioritizing areas adjacent to large protected tracts and creating contiguous networks of conservation lands for  wildlife corridors we continue to create more resilient landscapes.

Join us as we discuss how we are working together with new climate data to create a network of resilient protected lands and why our efforts matter now more than ever.

Panel discussion moderated by Jay Leutze, SAHC Board President and author.
Panel members:
Jess Laggis, Farmland Program Director, SAHC
Megan Sutton, Program Director, The Nature Conservancy
Ian Johnson, Geospatial Science Communications Associate, NEAMAC
Maria Whitehead, Senior Project Manager, Open Space Institute

Free and open to the public.
RSVP to Pauline Heyne at pauline@appalachian.org or 828.253.0095 ext. 216

Thank you to Catawba Brewing Co. for donating beer for the reception. We are so grateful for your support. 


This event is part of #WNCforthePlanet —  a collaboration of environmental and conservation groups in Western North Carolina to coordinate and raise awareness about events and volunteer opportunities scheduled throughout the month of April in honor of “Earth Month.” Local nonprofit organizations, universities, and businesses have teamed up to host a myriad of service days, workshops, hikes, educational events and celebrations. Join us in unifying our community to encourage and celebrate environmental stewardship for our planet and the region. More info at WNCforthePlanet.org.

Events

Nothing Found

Sorry, no posts matched your criteria